“Live Pterosaurs in Australia . . .” a new Book

Do Australians think poorly when they tell people that they have seen live pterosaurs? On the contrary, clear thinking is still alive down under. The new e-book Live Pterosaurs in Australia and in Papua New Guinea is based upon careful analysis of many eyewitness reports of living “pterodactyls” (called by some natives “ropen“) and upon careful analysis of the historical origin of the universal-extinction axiom.

Although the book is moderately short (equivalent to about 76 pages in a standard paperback book), it may be more comprehensive than any other nonfiction cryptozoology book in revealing sightings of apparent living pterosaurs in Australia. Nevertheless, sightings in Papua New Guinea dominate this new ebook. It even has a few details not mentioned in Searching for Ropens (the longest nonfiction book on living pterosaurs in the southwest Pacific).

How does this relate to clear thinking? The historical foundation of pterosaur fossil discovery is analyzed, revealing where the extinction assumptions comes from. The idea that all species of pterosaurs are long extinct was never proven scientifically. This fact is covered clearly in this book.

Live Pterosaurs in Australia, E-Book

You will here find reports of encounters with apparent living pterosaurs, including many accounts never before published in any book. Other sighting reports are condensed from the print book “Searching for Ropens.” . . .

New Book on Living Pterosaurs

What is a pterosaur? It’s not really a type of dinosaur, although it’s associated with them. The flying creature is called “pterodactyl” by many non-scientists; some Americans call those featherless fliers “dinosaur birds” or “prehistoric birds.”

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  1. […] “Live Pterosaurs in Australia . . .” a new Book The new e-book Live Pterosaurs in Australia and in Papua New Guinea is based upon careful analysis of many eyewitness reports of living “pterodactyls” (called by some natives “ropen“) and upon careful analysis of the historical origin of the universal-extinction axiom. […]

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